July 28, 2017
The Washington Post

Massachusetts stun gun ban challenge in federal district court

As I’ve noted, many jurisdictions have repealed their bans on stun guns. People v. Yanna (Mich. Ct. App. 2012) struck down one such ban on Second Amendment grounds, and in Caetano v. Massachusetts, the Supreme Court rejected some of Massachusetts’s arguments in favor of the stun gun ban. The court

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Case: Martel v. Healey

June 23, 2017
Forbes

Virtue Signaling Is A Terrible Foundation For Lawmaking

No matter how offensive some speech is, the power of government can’t be used to signal the virtuous views of the legislature.

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Case: Desmond v. Harris et. al.

June 8, 2017
Reason

Is This the Supreme Court’s Next Big Case Against Public-Sector Unions?

State governments can compel public-sector workers to pay union fees as a condition of employment, even when those workers are not union members. The U.S. Supreme Court approved this practice in the 1977 case Abood v. Detroit Board of Education, on the grounds that non-union “free riders” should still have

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Case: Yohn v. California Teachers Association

June 8, 2017
Education Week

Teachers’ Unions Have Much to Lose in Follow-Up to Friedrichs Case

Teachers’ unions escaped a potentially devastating blow when the U.S. Supreme Court deadlocked in the Friedrichs v. California Teachers Association case last spring, which meant the lower court ruling stood and they could continue to charge fees to nonmembers.

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Case: Yohn v. California Teachers Association

June 8, 2017
National Law Journal

The Supreme Court’s Next Big Union Fight: 6 Key Questions

Anti-union groups are making another major push in the U.S. Supreme Court to eliminate mandatory union dues, so-called “fair share” fees, for millions of public sector workers. This time, a full bench—if it takes the case—could end the deadlock that frustrated their efforts last year.

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Case: Yohn v. California Teachers Association

May 19, 2017
American Spectator

Freedom is Aboodiful Thing

On May 23, 1977, the U.S. Supreme Court issued a unanimous decision in Abood v. Detroit Board of Education. It was a terrible decision for worker freedom, and advocates for freedom have been trying to overturn it ever since.

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Case: Yohn v. California Teachers Association

may 18, 2017
Washington Post

California AG agrees: California law does not preclude private citizens from displaying Confederate battle flag at county fairs

Last year, California banned a painting of a Civil War battle from a county fair art show, because the painting included a Confederate battle flag. This was a misreading of California law (which, properly read, just limited what material the California government could itself sell and display), and the Center

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Case: Desmond v. Harris et. al.

May 2, 2017
Washington Post

State: California Confederate flag ban excludes individuals

California’s ban on displaying the Confederate flag doesn’t apply to individuals even if they are on government property, state officials said this week in settling a free speech lawsuit.

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Case: Desmond v. Harris et. al.

May 2, 2017
Fresno Bee

State agencies cannot fly the Confederate flag – but Californians still can

The California Attorney General has ruled that a painting was wrongly banned at The Big Fresno Fair in 2016 for displaying the Confederate flag.

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Case: Desmond v. Harris et. al.

May 2, 2017
Governing Magazine

Confederate Flag Ban Relaxed in California

California prohibits its government agencies from selling or displaying the Confederate flag. But in a settlement of a lawsuit by an artist, who had to wait a year before his Civil War painting that included the Stars and Bars could be shown at a state-sponsored fair, the state has agreed

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Case: Desmond v. Harris et. al.

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