Developers nail free speech

December 01, 2000

Don’t criticize developers if you don’t want to get sued

By Jeremy Rabkin

The American Spectator, December 1, 2000

Late last summer federal courts in California offered some good news for friends of free speech–and some bad news. The bad may well prove more significant than the good. But both developments should remind

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Developers nail free speech

December 01, 2000

Don’t criticize developers if you don’t want to get sued

By Jeremy Rabkin

The American Spectator, December 1, 2000

Late last summer federal courts in California offered some good news for friends of free speech–and some bad news. The bad may well prove more significant than the good. But both developments should remind

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Negative about affirmative action?

October 29, 2000

By Ed Bradley

60 Minutes (CBS News), October 29, 2000

ED BRADLEY, co-host: When it comes to affirmative action, Al Gore supports it unequivocally; George Bush isn’t so sure. But by the time one of them gets to the White House, the matter could be academic. A case that could decide the

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Blurring the lines between law, anarchy

October 23, 2000

By Bob Wiemer

Newsday, October 23, 2000

Paul Tonna is the Suffolk legislature’s presiding officer and one of the organizers of mid-October’s candlelight rally during which the “good” people of the county protested alleged manifestations of bigotry and hate by an amorphous and largely imagined phalanx of “bad” people. Tonna never stereotypes

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Keeping the faith

August 02, 2000

Review & outlook (editorial)

By the editors

The Wall Street Journal, August 2, 2000

Amid the parties and hoopla that defines a modern political convention, Republicans are making it clear that there are real policy stakes in the upcoming election. Take the GOP pledge to make more room for religion in treating America’s

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Was it law or poetry?

May 29, 2000

By John Leo

U.S. News & World Report, May 29, 2000

From press accounts, you might think that the Supreme Court did something amazingly reactionary in striking down part of the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA). Justice David Souter filed a dissent saying the decision reminded him of the obstructionist court of

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The arrogance of the Court

May 23, 2000

By Larry Kramer

The Washington Post, May 23, 2000

In 1994, after four years of very public debate, including testimony from hundreds of experts in dozens of hearings, Congress enacted the Violence Against Women Act. This month, a bare 5 to 4 majority of the Supreme Court brushed all that aside and

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In whose best interest? Not the states’

May 21, 2000

By Peter M. Shane

The Washington Post, May 21, 2000

The right of rape and domestic violence victims to sue their attackers in federal court–a right that Congress enacted in 1994 and the Supreme Court took away last week in the name of state sovereignty–was “a particularly appropriate remedy for the harm

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‘No winners’ in rape lawsuit

May 19, 2000

Two students forever changed by case that went to Supreme Court

By Brooke A. Masters

The Washington Post, May 19, 2000

At 23, Christy Brzonkala has had experiences few people could match in a lifetime: She’s been featured on national television, testified before Congress and fought a case all the way to the

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High court ruling is not a ‘setback’ for women

May 19, 2000

By Cathy Young

The Wall Street Journal, May 19, 2000

On Monday, the Supreme Court struck down a key provision of the 1994 Violence Against Women Act (VAWA), which allowed victims of “gender-motivated violence” to file federal civil-rights lawsuits against their attackers. This ruling, predictably deplored by some as a setback for

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